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  • C++

    CMPSC 101LAB 11 – Distance between two points with functions Prompt the user for two points #include lt;iostreamgt;// YOUR CODE GOES BELOW HERE#includelt;cmathgt;using namespace std;double distance(double p1, double q1, double p2, double q2);double distance(double p1, double q1,…

  • C)…

    Draw the typical worker’s budget line in both countries (put chairs on the vertical axis and tables on Question c) Draw the typical worker’s budget line in both countries (put chairs on the vertical axis and tables onQuestion 1(a) In economics, absolute advantage refers to the resource abundance of a givencountry compared to the other. Labor is also a resource in production .In tables, theForeign Country has… Economics

  • Assume that the marginal propensity to consume is equal to 0 85 If the government increased spending

    Question Assume that the marginal propensity to consume is equal to 0.85. If the government increased spending by $Z, and the real GDP increased by $5000, what is the value of Z? A)$750 B)$1000 C)$900 D)$800 Calculate the multiplier if the marginal propensity to consume (MPC) is equal to 0.99. A)10000 B)1000 C)500 D)100 Suppose the government increases spending by $100, as a result real GDP will: A)increase by less than $100. B)increase by more than $100. C)increase by $ 100. D)none of the above. If the marginal propensity to consume (MPC) is equal to 0.74, then the marginal propensity to save (MPS) is equal to: A)0.25 B)0.26 C)0.2 D)0.1…

  • Analysis Unemployment Discuss the trends of unemployment rates over the past 10 years and provide your

    Question Analysis – Unemployment: Discuss the trends of unemployment rates over the past 10 years and provide your objective analysis of the changes in unemployment and the current rates. Place extra emphasis on the periods where unemployment was either too high or too low (higher or lower than the natural rate of unemployment).Inflation: Discuss the trends of inflation rates over the past 10 years and their relationship with GDP growth and decline. Highlight the years that inflation was either higher or lower than usual and state the reason(s). Also state the effect of the high and low rates on GDP. Economics

  • Aggregate S &amp

    D 22.In the AD-AS model, assume that an economy’s aggregate demand, denoted by Question Aggregate S D 22.In the AD-AS model, assume that an economy’s aggregate demand, denoted by QD=400-P, and SR aggregate supply, denoted by QS=P, currently intersect at price level = $200 and the full employment output level = 200. Which of the following event is most likely to explain a new LONG-RUN equilibrium occurring at an output level of 300 and a price level of $100? A) Price of crude oil falls. B) The currency of Country X depreciates. Economics

  • A Compute total revenue for each level of output Fill in the table B Compute average and

    Question A. Compute total revenue for each level of output. Fill in the table. B. Compute average and marginal revenue for each level of output. Fill in the table. (Remember to compute marginal revenue between successive level of output.) C. Explain why for a perfectly competitive firm, AR = MR= p. D. Plot the TR,MR, AND AR curves on a scale diagram. What is the slope of the TR curve? Consider the following table showing the various rev –ence concepts for Dairy Treat Inc ., a perfectly competi-tive firm that sells milk by the litre . Suppose the firmfaces a constant market price of $2 per litre .TotalAverageMarginalPriceRevenueRevenueRevenue( P )Quantity(…

  • A …

    List all of the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) for which someone could fall Question a. List all of the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) for which someone could fall below 80% of the DRI. b. Now give sample foods that someone would eat for EACH of the micronutrients that were less than 80% of the DRI. Include at least one food that is an excellent source of that micronutrients (at least 20%DV in one serving), serving size and amount for each micronutrient. c. If your sodium intake is above 80%, please list it and give 3 ways you would decrease the amount of sodium in your diet.

  • 31 The nurse administrator reviews longitudinal hospitalbased data regarding nurse staffing and nursesensitive

    Question 31. The nurse administrator reviews longitudinal, hospital-based data regarding nurse staffing and nurse-sensitive patient outcomes. The data reveal that patient outcomes related to the development of pressure ulcers are better when the nurse-to-patient ratio is one nurse to four patients, as compared to staffing ratio of one nurse to six patients. What should the nurse administrator do with these data? A) Ensure that more baccalaureate-prepared nurses are hired by the organization B) Implement evidence-based practices tor prevention of pressure ulcers C) Continue to collect data in order to prove that staffing affects patient outcomes D) Develop a recommendation for changing the nurse-to-patient staffing ratio 45. When developing a quality…

  • 23

    Assume that an economy’s velocity of money circulation (V) is 4 and its nominal GDP (P*Y) is $20 Question 23. Assume that an economy’s velocity of money circulation (V) is 4 and its nominal GDP (P*Y) is $20 trillion. How much money supply is enough for transaction in the economy? (Hint: apply Equation for Exchange)

  • 21 Team activities in the middle schoolA

    Inhibit Question 21 Team activities in the middle school A. Inhibit self-confidence B. Inhibit individual skill development C. Provide inappropriate learning experiences D. Promote cooperative behavior

  • 1)…

    If the marginal product of labor is 2, the marginal product of capital is 4, the wage rate is $3, the Question 1) If the marginal product of labor is 2, the marginal product of capital is 4, the wage rate is $3, the rental price of capital is $6, and the price of output is $1.50, then the firm should a. Increase output by hiring more labor, more capital, or both. b. Hold output constant, but hire more labor and less capital. c. Decrease output by reducing the quantity of capital, reducing the number of units of labor, or both. d. None of the above is correct.

  • 1 You will be viewing the movie

    WALL STREET by renting, buying or borrowing the film from the Running head: WALLSTREET 1 Wall StreetNameInstitution WALLSTREET 2Wall Street The movie is built around the characters of one Bud Fox who really wants to work withGordon GeKko who is one of the… Economics

  • 1 The graph above shows

    Question 1.The graph above shows the AD/LRAS/SRAS functions for a country. 2.In the short run, wages and prices are sticky due to contracts, but they fully adjust to market conditions in the long run. 3.Marginal propensity to consume is MPC = 0.80 4.Okun’s coefficient equals α = 2. 5.Currently all the markets are in equilibrium. 6.There is no foreign trade and so net exports equal zero. 7.Currently the government purchases equal G = 1,000 units. 8.All the questions refer independently to this baseline scenario. 9.The short run effects of a policy or an event on P and Y are defined as the values of these variables after the AD function…

  • 1 If firm’s collectively increase the level of markup that they charge on

    goods and services, what effect will Question What is the expected effect of an increase in unemployment benefits on equilibrium outputand the equilibrium price level in the medium run? A) Neither prices nor output will change B) Prices will increase, while output will remain the same c) Prices will increase, and output will decrease D) Prices will increase, and output will increase E) Prices will decrease, and output will increase Economics

  • 1 …

    The marginal product of labor is the a. marginal revenue product minus the wage paid to the Question 1. The marginal product of labor is the a. marginal revenue product minus the wage paid to the worker. b. total amount of output divided by the total units of labor. 34. The marginal product of labor is the a. marginal revenue product minus the wage paid to the worker. b. total amount of output divided by the total units of labor. c.

  • 1 …

    How might aquatic mammals be affected in a natural environment if a coat or outer shell was Question 1. How might aquatic mammals be affected in a natural environment if a coat or outer shell was compromised by pollution? How might bird species be affected?

  • 1 …

    A representative firm in a perfectly competitive market has a total cost function: ATC(q) = Question 1. A representative firm in a perfectly competitive market has a total cost function: ATC(q) = 72/q + 4 + 2q and MC(q) = 4 + 4q. a. What is the firms fixed cost (FC) and variable cost (VC)? b. Calculate the market price at which profits would be zero. c. Calculate the profits or losses of the firms when price is $16. d. The market demand is given by Qd = 2000 – 20p. In the long run, what will the market demand be? How many firms will there be? I know the…

  • 1

    A) Describe the special characteristics of retailing? B) What are the Question OneSpecial Characteristics of RetailingMarket OrientationThis is the characteristic of retailing associated with retailing’s need for making decisions thatare different from time to…

  • 1

    A manufacturer of base units for home sensor protection (security, water, carbon monoxide, Question 1. A manufacturer of base units for home sensor protection (security, water, carbon monoxide, etc.) produces these units in a small facility in northern Indiana. The firm’s engineer has set up assembly cells in the facility that she believes will be the most efficient means of producing the units. The following table displays the various costs per hour for producing the units. Explain why Marginal Costs initially decline but then increase with the sixth unit of production. Which short run production principle is at work here in creating this pattern of Marginal Costs? Explanation must be…

  • There is

    one question, and please use your word to explain it and be careful it is not about . The violation of the key assumptions of a perfectly competitive markets lead to market failure and environmental problems. The first presumption for a perfectlycompetitive market is the… Environmental Economics

  • Motivations and Incentives

    First and foremost in studying and exam-taking are the incentives which drive or motivate us toward a goal. Incentives can be roughly divided into two classes: rewards and threats (or rewards and punishments). Basically, we react toward pleasant things and away from unpleasant ones. If you are “lacking in motivation,” or, more correctly, low in motivation, it means that you have not reacted enough toward the rewarding side of study or away from the fear of failure in a way that brings out your best self. People who do not measure up to their potential ability are called “under-achievers.” The graph in Fig. 1 illustrates their relative position (UA). Industrious,…

  • “This Subject Is of No Value to Me”

    How many times have you wondered, “Why do they make us learn this?” when confronted with a course for which you can see no earthly use? Driver training is a subject whose immediate value is obvious, but when it comes to many other things, like required mathematics, English, or history, the values become more obscure. The ruling about each separate required course has been passed upon by many people: school board members, educators, legislators, parents, and specialists in educational research. Each decision is backed up by fairly good evidence. One reason why certain subjects are required is that fundamental schooling has a benefit for society as a whole. There is…

  • Maturity

    Most people confuse maturity with adulthood. Maturity deserves a close look, since it contributes to your success in studies; if under-developed, the low degree of maturity may hold you back. Maturity is the ability to see the connection between today’s actions and tomorrow’s results. This eliminates the question of one’s age. Usually maturity improves with age, but not always. If a child can modify his behavior today on the promise of what will happen next week, and an adult cannot, it is correct to say the child is more mature than the adult. If one high school pupil can spend part of each evening at homework help while the other…

  • Girls and College

    A great many girls in the top half of their high school class do not go to college. This is a great loss to the nation in more ways than one. But there is an even deeper kind of loss: A girl who does not have the benefit of a good education finds out later that in many situations, including rearing children, the lack of the common fund of knowledge shared among her college friends leaves her out. She has to settle for a poorer job. She will have trouble dealing wisely with her children. She may even have to settle for a less desirable husband. This brings us to…

  • Competition

    Whether you are approaching the end of high school, or are already in college, or perhaps preparing for some special, post-graduate, or Civil Service exam, you must face an unpleasant fact: There are almost always more people competing than there are openings. Much unnecessary grief comes from not realizing this in time. Suppose that you are applying for a job for which you have had a fair amount of experience. You may imagine that you are a shoo-in for the job. But you are depending upon something which a competitor may also have, and he may have more of it. If you take an exam which contains questions that you…

  • Why Do We Compete?

    Each institution of higher education has its basic graduation requirements. They include a C average, and also usually include certain basic subjects all must take. The low-C students find the competition for a college C very keen. It may surprise many to learn that about 21% of the grades given in basic subjects are D’s and F’s (Figs. 2 and 3) They may have the opportunity to retake, at added cost, a few courses to earn a C, but eventually they are weeded out if they fail to improve. Figure 3 shows an idealized normal grade distribution curve which, of course, seldom occurs. In practical cases, the curve may be…

  • The Pace at College

    The competitive nature of college work is responsible for a faster pace. After all, only the better pupils from high schools can be admitted. When you go to college, you are saying, in effect, “For four years, self-education is my business. It is a competitive business, with the highest rewards going to those who make the most of the opportunity.” The familiar saying, “It’s not what you know, it’s whom you know,” is making less and less sense as the competition by business and industry increases to get those with know-how. There is a change, for example, as you move into college in the amount of attention given to the…

  • Attendance

    Attendance, while generally compulsory, is more liberally viewed than in high school. This means that you occasionally are permitted to “cut” without offering an excuse. Those who do not know how to discipline themselves with this feeling of freedom usually cut too many classes, thinking it will not matter. But cuts not only become a matter of official record – viewed as a big question-mark by prospective employers; they reduce very definitely your grasp of the subject. It is assumed that you are mature enough to want to attend, if only for selfish reasons. Professors are not likely to find time for appointments to go over work with you if…

  • Personal Attention

    The expanding population and the slow growth of college and university facilities have necessitated large classes in most subjects except foreign languages and advanced courses. The large classes often meet in smaller sections for more personal attention, it is true, but the professors are even then not as accessible outside class hours, mainly because they have so many students in their courses. They have far less time than is necessary to discuss each important point in the subject with each student, personally. This is not altogether bad. Students should become self-propelled as quickly as possible, for their own good. The enforced lack of personal attention in large classes has the…

  • Counseling

    Every institution takes into account the difficulties of transition from high school to college. The majority of teachers and staff at every college has experienced a little of that “alone feeling” that overtakes a person who has left familiar surroundings, friends, and family. There are trained people in counseling centers at all large institutions to take care of those needing someone with whom to talk. Their existence is a gratifying relief to busy professors who are hired to be concerned mainly with academic-matters, such as explaining principles to students and improving the clarity of teaching, keeping abreast of their changing subjects by extensive reading, and preparing and grading quizzes and…

  • Professors Are Different

    No one with experience has to be told that teachers in high school are different from one another. But for some reason, freshmen expect more uniformity in college than they get. A few professors stay very close to the subject as presented in the text­book. In the extreme cases, fortunately rare, they practically read the text­book in lecture. This is a waste of time, although weak students prefer to hear, rather than to read. Time spent in class should be devoted to explanations of difficult topics or to adding supplemental material which the textbook omits for lack of space; it should include up-to-date developments occurring since the textbook was published,…

  • Teaching for the Unknown Future

    Education is not simply bringing up-to-date what has been discovered in a particular area of knowledge. The faculty has another obligation to students which is extremely difficult to discharge well. The faculty must develop leaders and thinkers to meet the unknown future. As an example, consider one type of engineering. Technically, a person can be trained to build roads, railroads, and bridges according to existing patterns. But they must be and are trained for more than just that. They are led along lines of thought which some day will enable them to be creative and meet new situations. If there should be a trend, for example, toward monorail vehicles to…

  • Carry-Over

    Past personal achievements count for almost nothing, except the confidence they give you, as you enter new classes. This includes high school fame of all kinds. A record in one college class doesn’t carry over to another, either. The reverse is happily true, as well: A poor record doesn’t have to be lived with. You can start each course with a clean slate. Students are sometimes unwilling to stand out in a class by taking an aggressive part for fear they will be looked down upon by their classmates. A good professor helps a class overcome this reluctance to speak up. Not to speak up is a hindrance to self-education.…

  • Supervision

    Parental supervision lessens when you go to college unless you live at home. In fact, parents are frequently far away. When the parents customarily had supervised too closely, their offspring later experience a counteraction for a while. There is a joy in the new-found freedom, and work is postponed. Freedom is not all sweetness and light. It brings responsibilities in like amount. Your first few weeks away from home may get you off to a poor start, unless you look at the parents’ supervision in a new light: You now will have to care more about yourself to make up the deficit created by your parents’ absence. Where they acted…

  • Drifting Along – The Able Student

    Perhaps you are a very good student, reading this book to pick up any chance ideas that will help. You may be the type who suffers a let-down in some college classes because the work is beamed at the average. It may bore you. But, like many fine students, you may wrongly adopt the idea that because “grades are grades,” you can relax and drift along. You feel sure of the A. But is drifting along really the smart thing to do? Would you think much of a track star – a high-jumper, say – if he drifted along because there were no real challengers in sight? What of the…

  • Are Class Discussions Important?

    Most educators think of class discussions as educational experiences of the highest order, particularly if everyone has read the assignments on schedule. Students having trouble will wish that the class proceeded along the lines laid down by the textbook. However, many teachers assume that everyone can read. They encourage discussion of what has been read. As mentioned, the better students resent an unprepared student’s slowing down the class. There are several rewards for engaging in class discussions: One is that you sharpen your mind. You also learn what is not found in the limitations of a single textbook. And the chances are good that the topics discussed will be stressed…